Mannlicher-Schönauer 1905 9×56 “Fred. Pabst”

As those who have read Revivaler from it’s early days will know I have a real soft spot for Mannlicher-Schönauers of all descriptions and persuasions. I’m in good company mind you, Ernest Hemmingway was another Mannlicher-Schönauer fan. So when I saw this 9x56mm Mannlicher-Schönauer up for sale on the Cabela’s web site it naturally caught my eye, partly because it’s in a hard to reload calibre, and partly because it’s a rifle that may have had a historically significant past owner.

The name Fred Pabst under the trigger guard is potentially curious. This could not be Fred Pabst senior who founded the Pabst Brewing Company of Milwaukee as he passed away in 1904, the year prior to this rifle's release. But it could belong to his son Fred Pabst Junior. (Picture courtesy Cabela's).

The name Fred. Pabst under the trigger guard is potentially curious. This could not be Fred Pabst senior who founded the Pabst Brewing Company of Milwaukee as he passed away in 1904, the year prior to this rifle’s release. But it could have belonged to his son Fred. Pabst Junior. (Picture courtesy Cabela’s).

This Mannlicher-Schönauer was sold by Von Lengerke and Detmold of Broadway and Fifth Avenue, New York, to one F. Pabst on 21st October 1911. This could have been Frederick Pabst Junior, son of Frederick Pabst the founder of the Pabst Brewing Company of Milwaukee.

The name on the trigger guard is "Fred. Pabst" the dot after the word Fred indicating this is an abbreviation, most likely for Frederick. (Picture courtesy Cabela's).

The name on the trigger guard is “Fred. Pabst” the dot after the word Fred indicating this is an abbreviation, most likely for Frederick. (Picture courtesy Cabela’s).

There appears to be a measure of probability that this rifle may well have belonged to Frederick Pabst Junior. Documentation from Griffin and Howe is set out below.

Documentation from Griffin and Howe. (Picture courtesy Cabela's).

Documentation from Griffin and Howe. (Picture courtesy Cabela’s).

Whether or not this rifle is historically significant is not conclusively proved, but is probable. But notwithstanding that it’s a Mannlicher-Schönauer and that makes it a significant rifle on its own. The Mannlicher-Schönauer model of 1905 is chambered for the unusual but highly regarded 9x56mm Mannlicher-Schönauer cartridge. The 9mm rifle bullet size means this rifle will need bullets with a diameter around .355″-.356″. This is a size that is not necessarily easy to find although superb bullets could be cast and resized using Linotype alloy. That would be one of the easiest ways to get this rifle operational again if that was desired.

The best article I can find on-line for reloading the 9x56mm Mannlicher-Schönauer is an article originally published in the March-April 1983 edition of “Rifle: The Magazine for Shooters”. This edition features a well detailed and practical guide to reloading for the 9x56mm Mannlicher-Schönauer. You will find it in downloadable PDF format on riflemagazine.com if you click here.

The sale rifle appears to be in good condition even for a rifle that is over one hundred years old. (Picture courtesy Cabela's).

The sale rifle appears to be in good condition even for a rifle that is over one hundred years old. (Picture courtesy Cabela’s).

This interesting Mannlicher-Schönauer carbine is currently for sale on Cabela’s. You will find the sale page if you click here.

(Picture courtesy Cabela's).

(Picture courtesy Cabela’s).

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